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Wake Up! How To Meditate [part two]

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Written by Donna Rockwell

Om sweet om.

aNewDomain — Many people feel that time is rushing by, without an ability to shape or form our lives or have enough control over how we wake up to them. Is life satisfying? Or do I, instead, feel a subtle gnawing of longing or “unsatisfactory-ness” woven throughout my day?

The truth is that, in order to lead a more satisfied life, a more enlightened life, it is important, first of all, to understand how the human mind actually works. We are unknowing prisoners of our grasping minds, often swept away by whatever thought we may be having at the time. Lost in regretting the past or “catastrophizing” about the future, we give our thoughts too much power and miss out on experiencing the present moment, where all the promise lies. Check out my video below. I shot it in Lhasa, Tibet.

How To Meditate video: Dr. Donna Rockwell in Lhasa Tibet

Psychologists, teachers, sports coaches, corporations, healthcare institutions and, of course, Eastern gurus use skill-building techniques honed through mindfulness meditation practice to help develop enhanced abilities to stay present to the here-and-now of experience.

Why should you learn how to meditate? A growing body of empirical scientific research confirms what has been known for 2600 years: Mindfulness meditation can lead to greater awareness of the present moment. That means less time dwelling in negative ruminations about the past or obsessive worrying about the future. It also means you gain greater presence in the here-and-now of the moment, which can lead to deeper engagement, gratitude and joy.

The above video, which features mindfulness meditation instructions, can be used as part of your regular sitting practice. This will help you develop a daily practice and potentially enter the much-lauded path to wisdom, understanding and well-being.

The key thing is to get good at using your own breath as an anchor to the present moment.

Watched once in the morning and/or once at night, and used as a guided “meditate along-with” practice session, the above video will give you helpful and gentle tips to support what can often be a difficult task: developing a personal daily mindfulness practice. Using this video to learn how to meditate also helps you make sure you are not practicing alone.

Please check with doctor or psychologist before undertaking physical or mental training exercises.

I’d love to hear from you. Send questions and comments to me at mindfulnessineverydaylife@gmail.com. And here’s my latest post over at Huffpo: Living Mindfully, Living Happily Through Mindfulness Meditation in Everyday Life

For aNewDomain, I’m Dr. Donna Rockwell.

Cover image: by Francisco A. Salinas (panchito) oil on canvas, 44”x 44” 2009 (Humble High School IB ART Department) , via Wikimedia Commons

About the author

Donna Rockwell