Don’t US Kids Deserve The Right To Be Forgotten? [infographic]

right to be forgotten

Most US teens don’t believe the dumb things they record themselved doing online will haunt them later. They need the right to be forgotten, the same right European kids have now. Infographic.

aNewDomain — We all made mistakes when we were kids. Luckily, there was no Internet back then. All the stupid things kids are doing these days will be memorialized online, thanks to social media, and probably played at their funerals 60 or 70 years from now. Do those actions have a right to be forgotten?

It’s not too late to give kids and teens a second chance. Many don’t really understand, care or want to think about the consequences of posting dumb partying videos, racy material or videos and pictures that capture them doing something just plain stupid.

Various initiatives abroad have given kids the right to be forgotten. The US would be wise to put the same “right to be forgotten” initiatives and technologies in place. Online companies and social nets in the US typically collect data on everyone for revenue-sweetening purposes. But in doing so, they kill the chance of a clean slate for kids and teens. Any content posted before a kid turns 18 should be erasable — and wipeable. Check out the infographic below for more on this topic. Double click to enlarge.

Youth Rule the Web right to be forgotten

 

Infographic courtesy: OnlineClasses.org, All Rights Reserved.

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About the author

David Michaelis

Based in Australia, David Michaelis is a world-renowned international journalist and founder of Link Tv. Winner of Peabody award. At aNewDomain, he covers the global beat, focusing on politics and other international topics of note for our readers in a variety of forums. Email him at DavidMc@aNewDomain.net.

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